Work On Southbound I-65 Bridges and Roadway Progresses

Ironworker welding metal  bridge decking supports on southern I-65 bridge over Main Street.
Ironworker welding metal bridge decking supports on southern I-65 bridge over Main Street.

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The southbound I-65 work is progressing well as the Walsh Construction crews build the new bridges and roadway that will replace the old I-65 infrastructure. In this photo you can see the steel bridge decking being installed in the center of the image while an Ironworker welds the supporting angle iron in place. I chose this image because I like the way the figures are arranged from the foreground through the frame. I also like the way the welding arc is sparking and the way the welder is positioned in the image.

As in most of my work this too is a HDR image created from a three frame bracket set of +2, 0 and -2 EV exposures. I had to use an anti-ghosting setting of 100% in NIK HDR Efex Pro 2 to address the many different poses the figures were in between frames. The ability to shoot handheld images of people movin

Ironworkers installing metal  bridge decking on southern I-65 bridge over Main Street.
Ironworkers installing metal bridge decking on southern I-65 bridge over Main Street.

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This second image also shows the Ironworkers welding and placing the steel bridge decking. The decking will support the concrete during the pouring of the roadway after the Ironworkers place reinforcing rebar across the completed bridge deck prior to pouring of the concrete. Once again you can see the power of the NIK HDR Efex Pro 2 anti-ghosting feature, especially in the way it has rendered the woman’s leg as she kicks the steel decking into place. As in the previous image I had to use a setting of 100% anti-ghosting in order to freeze the action and avoid ghosting artifacts.

Concrete bridge beams for I-65 South over Slugger Field area approaching Main Street.
Concrete bridge beams for I-65 South over Slugger Field area approaching Main Street.

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I really liked the way the pre-stressed concrete bridge beams cast their shadows on the ground below them and the strong movement their placement gave to this image. This is also near Slugger Field where the new roadway is taking shape overhead. Once these bridges and roadways are completed traffic will be moved over onto this new roadway and demolition will begin on the old southbound I-65 infrastructure which will be replaced with new bridges and roadway. Once again I followed my normal HDR workflow of NIK HDR Efex Pro 2 and Aperture 3 processing.

Concrete bridge beams for I-65 South over Slugger Field area approaching Main Street. #2
Concrete bridge beams for I-65 South over Slugger Field area approaching Main Street. #2

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This final image in today’s post is once again from beneath the concrete bridge beams for the new southbound I-65. I shot this using my 12-24 mm Nikkor lens and decided to take it into Photoshop CS5 after merging the bracket set in order to correct the lens distortion inherent in such a wide angle shot. This too is a HDR image created from a three handheld frame bracket set merged in NIK HDR Efex Pro 2 and finished in Aperture 3.

8 thoughts on “Work On Southbound I-65 Bridges and Roadway Progresses

  1. Nick
    i have enjoyed reading your posts along the journey of this bridge. I have been particularly drawn to these images this time. My favorite one is the second one down, i love the colours, the lines going into the horizon, the metal loops are great, im not too keen on the first one, i think the blacks are too pale, but i am loving the underneath of the bridge with lines and the shadows, they’re great! Keep up the good work, i look forward to your next post, 🙂

    1. I agree with everything you say Karen. I struggled with that first image too. I tried adding contrast but just couldn’t get the blacks to pop without causing other unwanted effects. I couldn’t let go of the image though due to the flash of the welder’s arc and the composition. If I include it in an exhibit I’ll probably have to reprocess it. The day I first processed it I finally had to let go because I was just too close to the processing; I couldn’t distance myself from what I had already done.

      Thanks too for taking time to comment and share you thoughts here on the blog. It really means a lot to me when people are willing to enter a dialog about the work.

    1. Thanks Ellen. I couldn’t take my eyes off the scenes. In the first two images I wanted to take the viewer’s eye all the way back to the bridges on the left horizon. In the two other images I was overwhelmed by the graphic character of the beams and their shadows.

      I always appreciate hearing your comments and the way you approach the work. Thanks too for commenting here on the blog.

  2. Nick,
    I agree, these are wonderful images! They all combine to tell a story, and you will be the only one telling it so well! Congratulations!

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