Abstract Images From Construction

The Nuts and Bolts of Construction
The Nuts and Bolts of Construction

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The image above is of some construction fasteners used in the heavy construction concrete forms on the Ohio River Bridges Project that Walsh Construction is doing in Louisville KY. I liked the contrasts of the colors and textures and the randomness of the various items. I processed it using Topaz Clarity and Aperture 3.

Rock Drill Sediment Abstract
Rock Drill Sediment Abstract

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This image shows the sediment that settled on the rock drill being used to drill the piers for the Ohio River Bridges Project. I really liked the topographical feel that the sediment left on the metal surface as the water evaporated and dried while the tool was not in use. I shot it as a three frame bracket set and processed it using NIK HDR Eex Pro 2 and Aperture 3.

 

9 thoughts on “Abstract Images From Construction

  1. I appreciate your photographs and think they have an immediate appeal because of their colors. The problem I see is that they are not abstract photographs! An abstract work of art, by definition, has NO content, it only has lines, color and/or unrecognizable forms. The first photograph is all content, easily recognizable. The second maybe an abstract but my first reaction was that it was a mud slide. After reading the description, I realize I’m wrong but the description itself says it is not an abstract. I ask: why do you want to call these abstract photographs? What is the greater value you perceive by calling them abstract instead of recognizing them as excellent and interesting photographs, which is what they are? By calling them abstracts you dilute the meaning of abstract and reduce the value of a good photograph by not recognizing what it is for what it is. I agree with Lowell, that a book of these would be a great contribution to photography, but call it Photographs from Inside the Construction Site or something like that, just leave out the word abstract. Leaving out the word abstract also gives you more latitude in want you include, like the first photograph above. Thanks for showing the photographs, I really like the second one.

  2. I appreciate your photographs and think they have an immediate appeal because of their colors. The problem I see is that they are not abstract photographs! An abstract work of art, by definition, has NO content, it only has lines, color and/or unrecognizable forms. The first photograph is all content, easily recognizable. The second maybe an abstract but my first reaction was that it was a mud slide. After reading the description, I realize I’m wrong but the description itself says it is not an abstract. I ask: why do you want to call these abstract photographs? What is the greater value you perceive by calling them abstract instead of recognizing them as excellent and interesting photographs, which is what they are? By calling them abstracts you dilute the meaning of abstract and reduce the value of a good photograph by not recognizing what it is for what it is. I agree with Lowell, that a book of these would be a great contribution to photography, but call it Photographs from Inside the Construction Site or something like that, just leave out the word abstract. Leaving out the word abstract also gives you more latitude in want you include, like the first photograph above. I really like the second photograph because of the unique colors.

    1. Thanks for your thoughts Richard but I’ll stick with my initial categorization of these as abstract images. I appreciate your sharing your take on the subject of abstraction vs realism.

      While your argument has historical precedent it is not the only definition of the term “abstract” that is accepted and applied in art. One of the things I have learned over a lifetime as an artist is that there are no cut and dried rules or any consensus as to what constitutes a genre such as abstraction. Many photographers who label their work as abstract are using source material that, if one is aware of the origin, is identifiable. I tend to think of an abstract as something that represents a larger meaning and though identifiable speaks to an invisible quality or idea.

      Thank you also for the kind comment about the second image. I hope you will continue to view and engage with me about my work in the future.

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